we are committed
to faucets at every home

Water flowing from a household tap is the only way to sustainably interrupt the transmission of water-related illnesses and end the labor and time-intensive effort of water collection. 

Piped water . . .

ends the walk for water

= water for life

is a smart investment in poverty reduction and gender equity

is worth it

Lack of access to clean water has a disproportionate impact on women and girls because collecting water takes time.
200 million hours are spent each day traveling to water sources, waiting in line, and hauling heavy loads.

In the water sector, the all-too-familiar and incomplete solution looks like the installation of a community handpump, water supplied at a communal kiosk, rainwater storage, or home water filters.

When water is available at the home, families experience a complete solution that includes a faucet, a toilet, and a place to bathe, not to mention a cup of coffee. Maria, a 78-year-old grandmother from Las Cañadas, Honduras joyfully told us, “Now I begin my day with a cup of coffee rather than a walk for water.”

High-quality water systems are associated with greater sustainability. 

We have consistently found that when people can rely on 24/7 piped water service to their homes, they willingly pay the full costs of maintenance. All our household water connections are metered to encourage users to find and fix leaks and use water efficiently.
Household water access enhances women’s and girls’ success and increases their voice, agency, and economic empowerment.
Piped water to the home has been proven to increase women’s income by freeing up more time for employment. The percentage of households using piped water is associated with higher school attendance and enrollment, especially for girls. Educating girls has generational and societal impacts. More educated females have better healthcare, marry later, and are significantly more inclined to use birth control. They are also more likely to prioritize the education of their own children.
A faucet with running water and a water-seal toilet is not a premium system. These are essential services that people living in high-income countries have benefitted from for more than a century.
If hauling water is not the all-consuming task of the day, then women can focus on their future instead of mere survival. Our community-managed projects are a foundation for organizing people, building self-reliance, and taking collective action to address other development needs. Donors have an important role to play in changing the status quo for the over 2 billion people trapped in extreme poverty. When donors invest in complete solutions, we can create a healthier and more equitable world.

Piped water . . .

ends the walk for water

Lack of access to clean water has a disproportionate impact on women and girls because collecting water takes time.
200 million hours are spent each day traveling to water sources, waiting in line, and hauling heavy loads.

In the water sector, the all-too-familiar and incomplete solution looks like the installation of a community handpump, water supplied at a communal kiosk, rainwater storage, or home water filters.

When water is available at the home, families experience a complete solution that includes a faucet, a toilet, and a place to bathe, not to mention a cup of coffee. Maria, a 78-year-old grandmother from Las Cañadas, Honduras joyfully told us, “Now I begin my day with a cup of coffee rather than a walk for water.”

= water for life

High-quality water systems are associated with greater sustainability. 

We have consistently found that when people can rely on 24/7 piped water service to their homes, they willingly pay the full costs of maintenance. All our household water connections are metered to encourage users to find and fix leaks and use water efficiently.

is a smart investment in poverty reduction and gender equity

Household water access enhances women’s and girls’ success and increases their voice, agency, and economic empowerment.
Piped water to the home has been proven to increase women’s income by freeing up more time for employment. The percentage of households using piped water is associated with higher school attendance and enrollment, especially for girls. Educating girls has generational and societal impacts. More educated females have better healthcare, marry later, and are significantly more inclined to use birth control. They are also more likely to prioritize the education of their own children.

is worth it

A faucet with running water and a water-seal toilet is not a premium system. These are essential services that people living in high-income countries have benefitted from for more than a century.
If hauling water is not the all-consuming task of the day, then women can focus on their future instead of mere survival. Our community-managed projects are a foundation for organizing people, building self-reliance, and taking collective action to address other development needs. Donors have an important role to play in changing the status quo for the over 2 billion people trapped in extreme poverty. When donors invest in complete solutions, we can create a healthier and more equitable world.

Piped water saves lives

Piped water networks make it possible to perform the most important public health activities like handwashing and maintaining a water-seal toilet, creating a reliable barrier between flies and our poop.

88% of diseases and 50% of child deaths worldwide can be eliminated through household water supply and toilets.

13 gallons per person per day is the minimum quantity of water recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) to protect human health. Water1st has been using this guideline since day one. Through our post-construction evaluations we established that providing a water faucet at each household is the only reliable way to ensure families have access to this quantity of water. We are not alone in reaching this conclusion. After years of research, the United Nations also adopted water service at the home as a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG).

Household Tap
the Water1st Solution

Health risk:  Low

Communal Water System

Health risk:  High

Traditional Water Source

Health risk:  Very High

Household Tap
the Water1st Solution
Communal
Water System
Traditional Water Source
Drinking & cooking
Handwashing
Bathing & laundry
Toilet & all other hygiene
Health risk
Low
High
Very High

FAQs

Household filters can purify water. But they’re not a solution to the world water crisis, a far more complicated problem than unclean water. Here’s what household filters don’t do:

Household filters don’t end the walk for water, which is about time and gender equity; they don’t carry water for women and children. Women and girls in poor countries walk up to 5 hours a day carrying home heavy containers of water for their families. This prevents them from taking part in economic and development opportunities that move their communities forward, such as starting a small business. It also prevents millions of girls from going to school, thus perpetuating a cycle of illiteracy among women. Access to education impacts the population and economy of a country as a whole: countries with the least educated people are the poorest.

Household filters don’t make water convenient, accessible, or available at sufficient quantities. Why is water quantity so important? Unlike your average person in the U.S., who is using too much water, our beneficiaries need to use more water. Water is the foundation of good hygiene. If the goal is to prevent the spread of disease, then frequent hand washing, bathing, and the washing of dishes and clothes is as important, if not more important, than clean drinking water. Household filters only purify the water you have. When people don’t have enough water to practice good hygiene, household treatment devices such as filters are woefully inadequate.

Water1st projects address all pathways to disease: food preparation, working with animals, sanitation, and drinking. Having an accessible water supply and toilet nearby addresses every potential pathway.

Household filters typically cost a lot, especially when you take replacement costs into consideration, and not all people in a community can afford them. Households have a difficult time knowing when to replace a filter, and even if they do know when to replace, the high cost often results in families postponing the expense until it’s too late. It’s actually more economical and sustainable to support a Water1st community-level project that addresses water, sanitation, and hygiene, than it is to manage a household filter over time.

Filters don’t develop a community’s organizational capacity and help communities solve their own problems, beyond water. They are a quick fix, which really isn’t addressing the primary public health problem.
In the regions where we work, we have never heard a woman say that she misses carrying water for 5 hours a day. They only give thanks that they have safe, clean water nearby. A common response we hear is, “I thought I’d never see the day of having water at my house.” We once made the mistake of asking a woman in Honduras if she would walk with us to the water source she used before the water project. She politely but firmly refused. She said she never wants to walk to that water source again. The truth is that the social interactions at a water source are often very unpleasant. Women vie for the best locations to fill containers. Women who come from greater distances are considered intruders and often endure verbal and even physical abuse. When those women get access to a water source, they are elated. When they are actually part owners of the system, the part of their day that used to bring them shame becomes a source of pride.

It is true that there are cultural differences around the world. We can’t assume someone living in a far-off place wants the same things that we do. But having clean, easily accessible water is a fundamental human need. It transforms lives and lifts communities out of poverty. It ends terrible suffering.

We do work with local partners to insure cultural differences are respected and understood. This helps our projects succeed and last for the long haul.
We don’t live next to our water sources and that’s a good thing; densely populated areas near water sources lead to contamination. Our beneficiaries have been living on their land for years—their land is their livelihood. They have legal title or a long-term agreement with the government to farm on certain land, so they stay where they are for good reason.

Lack of access to water is often caused by two variables:

  1. As population grows, people begin to inhabit the land on the outer edge of the current community or city. This typically means they have to travel a little farther to get their water. Because of the weight of water, it doesn’t take long for the distance to the water source to become a barrier to good health. Each person needs about 10 gallons of water per day for drinking and personal hygiene. Very few communities on the planet have settlement patterns that allow every household to successfully collect 50 gallons of water a day without the assistance of a community water system.

  2. Some water sources have disappeared as a result of overuse, contamination, or a change in climate.


A corollary to this question is often, ”Why don’t people move to urban areas where there are water supply systems and sewer systems?” Many people are already doing this. For the first time in human history, the number of urban dwellers exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. Unfortunately, the pattern of migration to urban areas is already overwhelming the urban life-support systems. Few cities are able to meet the current demand for water and sewers, let alone effectively manage other health issues like trash collection and surface water runoff. Poor urban squatters typically have no legal way to connect to public water systems and sewers, exacerbating the water and sanitation crisis in dense urban areas. We believe it is better to help people create a better life for themselves where they are.

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Wine sales tax and shipping fees
Sales tax: Sales tax is based on your address. We’ll send you a receipt that includes your sales tax and shipping fee (if applicable).

Approximate shipping costs: Complimentary Seattle-area deliveries for all purchases.

Fall 2023 promotion – Free shipping of orders of 12 bottles (1 case) or more. You may order as many cases as you want.

Please note approximate shipping costs vary depending on destination. Due to shipping fees that are beyond our control, our suggested minimum order is 3 bottles:
1-3 bottles $24-28
6 bottles $27-37
12 bottles $37-57
*If shipping to Alaska and Hawaii, please call the winery for a quote at (509) 875-2211

Shipping available to the following 34 states + Washington DC: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Washington DC, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Water from Wine is a very small winery and unable to benefit from competitive shipping rates that larger wineries enjoy. Wine is shipped via UPS, which adds additional fees for shipping alcohol because an adult over 21 must sign for delivery. Water from Wine does not profit from shipping costs. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns.
Wine sales tax and shipping fees

Sales tax: Sales tax is based on your address. We’ll send you a receipt that includes your sales tax and shipping fee (if applicable).

Approximate shipping costs:
Fall 2021 promotion – Free shipping of orders of 12 bottles (1 case). You may order as many cases as you want. Free shipping promotion is limited to 2 cases/person/month.

Please note approximate shipping costs vary depending on destination. Due to shipping fees that are beyond our control, our suggested minimum order is 3 bottles:
1-3 bottles $24-28
6 bottles $27-37
12 bottles $37-57
*If shipping to Alaska and Hawaii, please call the winery for a quote at (509) 875-2211

Shipping available to the following 36 states + Washington DC: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Washington DC, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Water from Wine is a very small winery and unable to benefit from competitive shipping rates that larger wineries enjoy. Wine is shipped via UPS, which adds additional fees for shipping alcohol because an adult over 21 must sign for delivery. Water from Wine does not profit from shipping costs. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns..